Watch RWISA Write Blog Tour – Gwen Plano #RWISA #RRBC

John Howell hosted Gwen Plano who wrote this beautiful and moving story. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did.

Fiction Favorites

Rave Reviews Book Club. One of the objectives of the club is to recognize outstanding talent in its membership. A literary group has been established within RRBC named Rave Writers – International Society of Authors (RWISA). This month the club is featuring these authors on a tour. I will be hosting them throughout the month, and I hope you enjoy being introduced to some excellent writing.

RWISA

Gwen Plano

Love at First Sight

By Gwendolyn M Plano

“It doesn’t seem real. It just doesn’t seem real.” Mom muttered as she ran her hand over the curves of dad’s headstone. Sighing deeply, she stared blankly into the horizon.

After a few minutes, she turned and faced me. “I tell myself that it must be real.” She seemed to want my approval. “The stone says we were married 70 years. It must have happened; I must have been married. But, but…why can’t I…

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Best Literary Analysis Topics and Themes: the Ultimate List

Jack Milgram brought to my attention this interesting article he published on CustomWriting.org.  This is especially of interest to all writers and to parents, students, and teachers.  After reading, I encourage you to check out some of Jack’s other posts.

A wide range of literary analysis topics will aid you in making the best choice for writing about books. Check for the full list here.

Source: Best Literary Analysis Topics and Themes: the Ultimate List

Mary Cool, editor-in-chief of the Ducts Magazine talks about publishing

Damyanti Biswas of the blog daily(w)rite interviews Mary Cool of Ducts Magazine in this post. If you are a reader or a writer, please read and check out both websites.

Here on Daily (w)rite, as part of the guest post series, it is my pleasure today to welcome Mary Cool, editor-in-chief of the Ducts Magazine. What drives Ducts magazine? What are your plans for its future?Well, it just so happens we’re in the middle of an exciting time for Ducts. We just

Source: Mary Cool, editor-in-chief of the Ducts Magazine talks about publishing

Riddle Me Ree

Do you love riddles? Enjoy reading Riddle-Me-Ree by Stuart France.

Stuart France

2 - S France*

The device of riddling is common to most traditional cultures.

Maidens set riddles for their suitors: ‘What is sweeter than mead…?’ ‘What is whiter than snow…?’ ‘What is lighter than a spark…?’

Antagonists use riddles to settle their disputes: ‘Forty white horses on a red hill first they gnash then they champ then they stand still…?’ ‘What is blacker than the raven…?’ ‘What is swifter than the wind…?’

Divinities play hide and seek with their devotees within the miasmic form of riddles: ‘What dances on the surface of the water…?’ ‘What good did Man find on earth that God did not…?’ ‘What is sharper than the sword…?’

A riddle is one thing, or a collection of things, described as another thing, or a different collection of things.

It is an extended metaphor without its point of reference.

To solve a riddle is to gain clarity and rid one self…

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EDITING 101: 47 – Dangling Modifiers…

Do you get tripped-up by dangling modifiers? Here is an informative and fun post on dangling modifiers by Susan Uttendorfsky.

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Originally posted as the Dun Writin’—Now Whut? series on this blog, EDITING 101 is a weekly refresher series for some of you and brand new for others.

Courtesy ofAdirondack Editing

Dangling Modifiers

In a previous article, we discussed dangling participles(EDITING 101:24). Today we’re going to discuss dangling modifiers.

If you remember, “dangling” is another word for “misplaced.” A modifier is a noun or an adjective that amends or explains, adding description to another noun. So a dangling modifier is simply a word modifying a noun that is in the wrong place, thereby making the sentence ambiguous or confusing, and sometimes downright funny.

Incorrect: The woman walked the dog in purple suede cowboy boots.

Correct: The woman in purple suede cowboy boots walked the dog.

Incorrect: We saw several monkeys on vacation in Mexico.

Correct: While on vacation in Mexico, we saw several monkeys.

Incorrect: We saw several…

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Take control – A beginner’s guide to spam and how to spot it …

An excellent guide to recognizing and controlling spam on your blog by Sue Vincent.

Sue Vincent's Daily Echo

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There is a debate about whether or not you should manually moderate all comments before allowing them to appear on you blog. I personally do not moderate every comment. I do moderate every first comment from a reader and it is usually fairly easy to spot who is genuine and who is a spammer.

Spammers should not be allowed on your blog if you can possibly prevent it. They will, if you are not keeping an eye on the ball, fill your post comments with their advertisements for everything from Russian brides to sex aids, training shoes to financial scams.

Should  a spammer get through the many barriers WordPress has put in their way, a vigilant blogger will soon spot their comments and consign them to the spam folder with a single click. Once sent to spam, Askimet generally gets the message pretty quickly and all future comments from that…

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How Much Do You Know About Irony? | Nicholas C. Rossis

An informative and useful post on irony from the blog of Nicholas Rossis.  When you hop over to check this out, wander around his blog and read some of his other fantastic posts.

 

You may remember some of Reedsy’s awesome creations such as Writing Dynamic Characters and Third Person Limited vs Omniscient PoV. Well, Ricardo Fayet and his team have done it again with a l…

Source: How Much Do You Know About Irony? | Nicholas C. Rossis