Mary Cool, editor-in-chief of the Ducts Magazine talks about publishing

Damyanti Biswas of the blog daily(w)rite interviews Mary Cool of Ducts Magazine in this post. If you are a reader or a writer, please read and check out both websites.

Here on Daily (w)rite, as part of the guest post series, it is my pleasure today to welcome Mary Cool, editor-in-chief of the Ducts Magazine. What drives Ducts magazine? What are your plans for its future?Well, it just so happens we’re in the middle of an exciting time for Ducts. We just

Source: Mary Cool, editor-in-chief of the Ducts Magazine talks about publishing

Riddle Me Ree

Do you love riddles? Enjoy reading Riddle-Me-Ree by Stuart France.

Stuart France

2 - S France*

The device of riddling is common to most traditional cultures.

Maidens set riddles for their suitors: ‘What is sweeter than mead…?’ ‘What is whiter than snow…?’ ‘What is lighter than a spark…?’

Antagonists use riddles to settle their disputes: ‘Forty white horses on a red hill first they gnash then they champ then they stand still…?’ ‘What is blacker than the raven…?’ ‘What is swifter than the wind…?’

Divinities play hide and seek with their devotees within the miasmic form of riddles: ‘What dances on the surface of the water…?’ ‘What good did Man find on earth that God did not…?’ ‘What is sharper than the sword…?’

A riddle is one thing, or a collection of things, described as another thing, or a different collection of things.

It is an extended metaphor without its point of reference.

To solve a riddle is to gain clarity and rid one self…

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EDITING 101: 47 – Dangling Modifiers…

Do you get tripped-up by dangling modifiers? Here is an informative and fun post on dangling modifiers by Susan Uttendorfsky.

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Originally posted as the Dun Writin’—Now Whut? series on this blog, EDITING 101 is a weekly refresher series for some of you and brand new for others.

Courtesy ofAdirondack Editing

Dangling Modifiers

In a previous article, we discussed dangling participles(EDITING 101:24). Today we’re going to discuss dangling modifiers.

If you remember, “dangling” is another word for “misplaced.” A modifier is a noun or an adjective that amends or explains, adding description to another noun. So a dangling modifier is simply a word modifying a noun that is in the wrong place, thereby making the sentence ambiguous or confusing, and sometimes downright funny.

Incorrect: The woman walked the dog in purple suede cowboy boots.

Correct: The woman in purple suede cowboy boots walked the dog.

Incorrect: We saw several monkeys on vacation in Mexico.

Correct: While on vacation in Mexico, we saw several monkeys.

Incorrect: We saw several…

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Take control – A beginner’s guide to spam and how to spot it …

An excellent guide to recognizing and controlling spam on your blog by Sue Vincent.

Sue Vincent's Daily Echo

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There is a debate about whether or not you should manually moderate all comments before allowing them to appear on you blog. I personally do not moderate every comment. I do moderate every first comment from a reader and it is usually fairly easy to spot who is genuine and who is a spammer.

Spammers should not be allowed on your blog if you can possibly prevent it. They will, if you are not keeping an eye on the ball, fill your post comments with their advertisements for everything from Russian brides to sex aids, training shoes to financial scams.

Should  a spammer get through the many barriers WordPress has put in their way, a vigilant blogger will soon spot their comments and consign them to the spam folder with a single click. Once sent to spam, Askimet generally gets the message pretty quickly and all future comments from that…

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How Much Do You Know About Irony? | Nicholas C. Rossis

An informative and useful post on irony from the blog of Nicholas Rossis.  When you hop over to check this out, wander around his blog and read some of his other fantastic posts.

 

You may remember some of Reedsy’s awesome creations such as Writing Dynamic Characters and Third Person Limited vs Omniscient PoV. Well, Ricardo Fayet and his team have done it again with a l…

Source: How Much Do You Know About Irony? | Nicholas C. Rossis

Eldest

Enjoy this beautiful poem by my multi-talented friend, Sue Vincent.

Sue Vincent's Daily Echo

“Just how old are you?”
Although youth has long died,
“As young as the moment,”
My body replied.
“If I want to play out
In the sun, or climb trees,
Run laughing through dewdrops,
…I’ll do as I please.
I have a few wrinkles,
My hair’s going grey…
Inside I’m a child
And I still need to play.”

“Just how old are you then?”
My body asked mind,
“As old as conception,
Just think and you’ll find
I’ve been here all along,
In your cells and your brain,
Learning forever and seeking to gain
From experience, wisdom
That I can impart…
But perhaps we should ask
Just how old is the heart?”

“Just how old are you?”
Said the heart, “Here’s the deal…
I’m living two lives,
One to beat, one to feel.”
To the body, heart answered,
“My beating is yours.”
To the mind it replied,
“When you feel…

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The Case of the Sad Mischievous Ghost

Davey & Derek Junior Detectives Series Book 5

By Janice Spina

 

Book Blurb

Twins Davey and Derek Donato are enlisted by two new characters, Abby and her cousin Holly, to assist them in finding and capturing the spooky beings that haunt their house.

When the boys visit Abby’s house they discover that this old Victorian holds many secrets and shocking revelations.

Davey and Derek soon find that they need the assistance of their Great Aunt Gigi to handle these mischievous phantoms.

My Review

Once again, Davey and Derek are off on an adventure to solve a mystery.  These two young detectives are on the trail of ghosts that are living in their friend Abby’s house.  Abby and her cousin Holly are school mates of Davey and Derek and have more interest in them than just finding the ghosts.  When they visit Abby’s home, a large old Victorian house, they discover the house holds secrets even Abby’s parents didn’t know about.  Of course, once again, they enlist their Great Aunt Gigi to help them.

This was once again another delightful middle-grade book in the Davey & Derek Junior Detectives Series.  Davey and Derek and their friends are delightful children who are respectful and considerate of others, but who don’t hesitate to do a bit of sleuthing under the nose of Abby’s parents.

As with the other books in this series, The Case of the Sad Mischievous Ghost is well written and meets the author’s criteria for instilling the love of reading in children.

I highly recommend The Case of the Sad Mischievous Ghost to all middle graders and to their parents.  This would be a wonderful book to share, with parents taking a turn reading aloud.

About the Author

Janice Spina is an award-winning author with nine children’s books, Louey the Lazy Elephant, Ricky the Rambunctious Raccoon, Jerry the Crabby Crayfish (won Pinnacle Book Achievement Award), Lamby the Lonely Lamb (won the Silver Medal from MOM’S Choice Awards), and Jesse the Precocious Polar Bear, Broose the Moose on the Loose and Sebastian Meets Marvin the Monkey, Colby the Courageous Cat, and Jeffrey the Jittery Giraffe. Davey & Derek Junior Detectives Series (Book 1, 2, 3, 4 & 5) is a middle-grade/preteen series. Book 1, The Case of the Missing Cell Phone won the Pinnacle Book Achievement Award and an Honorable Mention from Readers’ Favorite Awards. Book 2, The Case of the Mysterious Black Cat, won the Pinnacle Book Achievement Award and Book 3, The Case of the Magical Ivory Elephant, also won the Pinnacle Book Achievement Award.

Janice has published two novels under J. E. Spina, Hunting Mariah, a thriller/mystery and her paranormal/mystery/romance novel, How Far Is Heaven, and a short story collection, An Angel Among Us, all available on Amazon and Barnes & Noble. She is working on two children’s books, book 2 of Hunting Mariah and a mystery series for YA girls will be written in 2018 along with a YA fantasy series. Her husband is her illustrator and cover creator.

She has written over a hundred poems and two other novels. The two novels need editing before publishing. Janice says, “There is always another story swimming around in my head. If I don’t write them down they are lost forever.”

Her logo is JEMSBOOKS for all ages on which is her motto:
“Reading Gives You Wings To Fly! Soar with Jemsbooks!'”

Janice’s and John’s joint goal is: To encourage children to read and to instill this love of reading in them to carry them through life and thus giving them ‘wings to fly!’

She loves to hear from readers and appreciates reviews. She says, “It’s like Christmas each time I receive a review!”

Author Biography taken from Goodreads.

Author Links

Website – Jemsbooks

Blog – Jemsbooks (on WordPress)

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