How do you read it?

Just as everyone has a different style of writing, M.A. Lossl shows us there are different ways to read.

M.A. Lossl

As an author, I’m fascinated by the way people read. Is it possible to write a book to suit all reading styles?

Begin at the beginning, go on to the end, then stop, is not for everyone.

For myself, over the years, I’ve had many different reading needs.

Bookworm: I was an avid reader. Every opportunity, I would read from front to back. I remember having an argument with my dad, at the meal table. He read his newspaper, so I read my book. He did not approve, somewhat hypocritically, I felt. I felt sad to finish a good story; the library was my favourite place.

Short and sharp:  During my teenage years, magazines were my favourite. I first read The New Scientist when I was sixteen, but soon got into all the popular magazines. Life was busy. Time for avid reading was short. Short articles filled my…

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Writing in Different Genres!

Yes, my author friends, Janice Spina is proof that you can successfully write in multiple genres.

Jemsbooks

DD Book 5 Award coverJerryAwCoverBroose CoverIMG_4930

Writing in Different Genres

How important is it for authors to be able to write across genres?

First of all, not everyone cares to write in multi-genres. There are some who choose to write in one genre and for select readers. There is nothing wrong with writing in one or multi-genres. Who am I to tell anyone what is the right thing to do?

If you look at J K Rowling, for instance, she has excelled in writing for YA, PT, MG groups (young adult, preteen, middle-grade). She has also written for 18+. I am one of her biggest fans for the first group but I did not enjoy the 18+ mysteries as much as the Harry Potter series. That does not mean that her books didn’t sell well! On the contrary, once she became established as a successful author anything she wrote (even under a pen name) sold off…

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Taps – Memorial Day

My husband, George, shares a story each year in remembrance of those who have paid the highest price for our country.

Thinkin' Things Over

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Nine years ago, I buried my father in Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Virginia.  He was 86 and an Army veteran of WWII; part of ‘the greatest generation.’  As we drove to the burial site we passed row after row after row of white tombstones perfectly aligned in all directions.  The tombstones reached out over rolling hills like fields of wild flowers.  As I absorbed this vista, the tombstones seemed to speak out, in ever so soft voices, offering untold stories of service to our Country.  Is anybody listening?  Will you remember me?  Do you care?

Graves with Flags

On subsequent visits I have noticed that many of the graves are of young men and women who never got the chance to grow up and age with their families.  Lives cut short, standing their watch, so the rest of us could enjoy the freedom provided by this great Country.

In the vastness of this…

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No Wasted Ink Writers Links

A Match Made In War

Thinkin' Things Over

Dad in UniformMarvin began his journey as a radio operator aboard the battleship USS Indiana in the South Pacific during WWII.  Over the course of three years he participated in the battles of Tarawa, Saipan, Battle of the Philippine Sea, Great Marianas Turkey Shoot, Iwo Jima, Okinawa and the Bombardment of Japan, destroying enemy positions in advance of landing of our soldiers and Marines.  The USS Indiana won numerous battle stars and citations during the War.

Of interest to this post was the Indiana’s participation in the Battle of Okinawa and a sailor aboard that ship named Marvin.  While enduring numerous kamikaze attacks, the Indiana unleashed a relentless bombardment of the island’s defenses to support the invasion.

DadTed began his journey as an infantryman in the Army’s 96th Infantry Division in the South Pacific.  Over the course of two years he participated in the Battle of Leyte, Philippines, and the Battle…

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Fulfilled

Anytime I can read a lovely poem such as this, I am compelled to share it. Dear readers, please enjoy Lauren Scott’s poem, Fulfilled.

Baydreamer

Let me drink from the look in your eyes
eyes that have me wildly mesmerized
mesmerized under their piercing blue spell
spell that only you hold powers to cast over me
me, with a heart out-of-control in love
love, a whirlwind of euphoric emotions so true
true in not only our hearts, but in our minds
minds, fully aware of their endless thoughts
thoughts so amorous of us entwined
entwined in each other’s arms forever,
forever, still too few seconds for our time together

Lauren Scott © 2018

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On learning myself

Please read and enjoy Jane Dougherty’s beautiful response to the dverse prompt “a couple of stanzas in the style of the Rubaiyat.”

Jane Dougherty Writes

For the dverse prompt, a couple of stanzas in the style of the Rubaiyat.

What did I dream before the words took hold

Before the sun, the moon, the stars grew old?

I squandered time, knew little of its worth,

Beneath soft nights of silver, days of gold.

The hand, the heart that guide the words to birth

Have grown in strength, an oak tree’s mighty girth,

Your face before me lighting day and night,

I learn to write the beauty of our earth.

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Book Bee’s Step by Step Guide to Reviewing Books

I found this simple explanation of how to write a review over on Behind the Willows. Even if you don’t read children’s books, you can still give simple reviews like their examples. The point is, if you read a book and enjoy it, thank the author with a review.

Behind the Willows

Step 1: Read a book!

Step 2: Decide to Write a Review.

How often do you pick up a book without a recommendation or perusing reviews online? I still occasionally judge books by their cover at the local library but mostly I rely on recommendations from friends or via reviews online, and I bet you do too.
All of us readers love reviews!
Love a book, want to support an author? The best way is to write an honest review. Reviews are hugely important to us (largely because, like I mentioned, nobody picks up books without looking at reviews).
Love a book and want to support an illustrator? Ditto!
So, if you love readers, authors, illustrators or anyone else in the book industry, support them all and write a review!

Step 3: Don’t Panic!

Maybe you’ve never written a review before, maybe you don’t know where to start.
It’s okay…

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Springtime Reception (Haiku) by Bette A. Stevens

Join the party! Bette A. Stevens has penned the invitation to Springtime with her lovely haiku.

Bette A. Stevens, Maine Author

National Poetry Month is coming to a close and spring has finally arrived here at The Farmstead in central Maine. After three consecutive days of sunshine with temperatures in the 50s—followed by two days of rain—blossoms are sending out official invitations. Needless to say, we’re dressed for the occasion and heading outdoors to attend the reception.

These glorious daffodils (photo) in our front garden inspired me to write “Springtime Reception” and we’re more than ready to join the party.

Happy Spring!

~Bette A. Stevens, Maine author

Springtime Reception

Haiku by Bette A. Stevens

Beguiling blossoms
Address the  invitations
“Springtime Reception”

[Explore Bette’s Blog]

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