A Match Made In War

Thinkin' Things Over

Dad in UniformMarvin began his journey as a radio operator aboard the battleship USS Indiana in the South Pacific during WWII.  Over the course of three years he participated in the battles of Tarawa, Saipan, Battle of the Philippine Sea, Great Marianas Turkey Shoot, Iwo Jima, Okinawa and the Bombardment of Japan, destroying enemy positions in advance of landing of our soldiers and Marines.  The USS Indiana won numerous battle stars and citations during the War.

Of interest to this post was the Indiana’s participation in the Battle of Okinawa and a sailor aboard that ship named Marvin.  While enduring numerous kamikaze attacks, the Indiana unleashed a relentless bombardment of the island’s defenses to support the invasion.

DadTed began his journey as an infantryman in the Army’s 96th Infantry Division in the South Pacific.  Over the course of two years he participated in the Battle of Leyte, Philippines, and the Battle…

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Fulfilled

Anytime I can read a lovely poem such as this, I am compelled to share it. Dear readers, please enjoy Lauren Scott’s poem, Fulfilled.

Baydreamer

Let me drink from the look in your eyes
eyes that have me wildly mesmerized
mesmerized under their piercing blue spell
spell that only you hold powers to cast over me
me, with a heart out-of-control in love
love, a whirlwind of euphoric emotions so true
true in not only our hearts, but in our minds
minds, fully aware of their endless thoughts
thoughts so amorous of us entwined
entwined in each other’s arms forever,
forever, still too few seconds for our time together

Lauren Scott © 2018

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On learning myself

Please read and enjoy Jane Dougherty’s beautiful response to the dverse prompt “a couple of stanzas in the style of the Rubaiyat.”

Jane Dougherty Writes

For the dverse prompt, a couple of stanzas in the style of the Rubaiyat.

What did I dream before the words took hold

Before the sun, the moon, the stars grew old?

I squandered time, knew little of its worth,

Beneath soft nights of silver, days of gold.

The hand, the heart that guide the words to birth

Have grown in strength, an oak tree’s mighty girth,

Your face before me lighting day and night,

I learn to write the beauty of our earth.

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Book Bee’s Step by Step Guide to Reviewing Books

I found this simple explanation of how to write a review over on Behind the Willows. Even if you don’t read children’s books, you can still give simple reviews like their examples. The point is, if you read a book and enjoy it, thank the author with a review.

Behind the Willows

Step 1: Read a book!

Step 2: Decide to Write a Review.

How often do you pick up a book without a recommendation or perusing reviews online? I still occasionally judge books by their cover at the local library but mostly I rely on recommendations from friends or via reviews online, and I bet you do too.
All of us readers love reviews!
Love a book, want to support an author? The best way is to write an honest review. Reviews are hugely important to us (largely because, like I mentioned, nobody picks up books without looking at reviews).
Love a book and want to support an illustrator? Ditto!
So, if you love readers, authors, illustrators or anyone else in the book industry, support them all and write a review!

Step 3: Don’t Panic!

Maybe you’ve never written a review before, maybe you don’t know where to start.
It’s okay…

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Springtime Reception (Haiku) by Bette A. Stevens

Join the party! Bette A. Stevens has penned the invitation to Springtime with her lovely haiku.

Bette A. Stevens, Maine Author

National Poetry Month is coming to a close and spring has finally arrived here at The Farmstead in central Maine. After three consecutive days of sunshine with temperatures in the 50s—followed by two days of rain—blossoms are sending out official invitations. Needless to say, we’re dressed for the occasion and heading outdoors to attend the reception.

These glorious daffodils (photo) in our front garden inspired me to write “Springtime Reception” and we’re more than ready to join the party.

Happy Spring!

~Bette A. Stevens, Maine author

Springtime Reception

Haiku by Bette A. Stevens

Beguiling blossoms
Address the  invitations
“Springtime Reception”

[Explore Bette’s Blog]

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How to select the picture you want for your post

Jean Cogdell makes selecting the picture for your post on FB easy-peasy!

Jean's Writing

Are you frustrated with Facebook?

Irritated every time you click the share button and Facebook chooses the wrong picture to post?

Me too!

What’s this all about? Apparently, from what I’ve been able to find out, Facebook controls this in an effort to stop people from changing legit articles by adding fake pictures.

Huh?

I don’t know about you but I’m tired of the same picture posting every time I click share. So, I’ve discovered a workaround. Well, works most of the time.

Instead of clicking on the share button, try this.

  • First copy your post address. (  https://      )
  • Open your Facebook page.
  • Paste the post address in Facebook.

The link should show default picture with arrows so you can select a different image.

If this doesn’t work, you may need to SCRAPE/DEBUG your Facebook. 

Click on this link – FACEBOOK DEBUG

After you click the…

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Don’t throw out the baby! Why #Amazon doesn’t want your #BookReviews

Barb Taub explains Amazon’s new change in their reviewing policy.

Barb Taub

An open letter to Amazon:

Dear Amazon,

I should be your Holy Grail. I’m the real deal, an actual reader who goes through books carefully, thinks about what they mean and how they’re written, and then writes a considered, thoughtful, and hopefully helpful analysis—in other words, I’m a book reviewer.

Writers, potential customers, publishers, and oh yes—you, Amazon—should be jumping for joy and giving thanks that I’ve taken hours to read and yet more hours to craft reviews for hundreds of books. Instead, Amazon, you’ve decided to punish reviewers like me.

In the name of discouraging “fake” reviews, your new policy requires reviewers like me to spend $50 on Amazon’s US site and even more, £40 on Amazon UK before I can share my review. Have you thought about other solutions, or the effect this will have on legitimate reviewers?

Amazon has figured out how to conduct millions of legitimate…

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Time Trail

By Janet Slater

Book Blurb

Casey arrives in southwest Ohio expecting a working retreat, staying at a historic home along a wooded bike trail while analyzing lead-contaminated soil samples at an abandoned ammunition factory. Instead she is drawn into events that shape history along two railroads-one, buried by the bike trail, that took a newly-elected president to his inauguration and a Civil War; and the other an Underground Railroad of courageous people and high ideals, but also of buried secrets. Told through a fugitive slave interview, newspaper articles, an old diary and modern narration, three stories intertwine in this novel based on a real place and people both real and imagined.  (Goodreads.com)

My Review

This novella length novel was right up my alley.  It is a historical fiction set right in my backyard. The story takes place between the towns of Morrow, Ohio and Fosters, Ohio along the Little Miami Scenic Trail (a wooded bike/walking trail) in southwestern Ohio.  Much of the story takes place at the Peters Cartridge Factory which is abandoned and is situated between the two towns and just over the hill from my house.

Casey came to Ohio to collect soil samples at the old factory. She rented an old house in Fosters that still exists today. The house was built by Henry Butterworth and was a stop on the Underground Railroad.  In order not to reveal too much of the story, I won’t delve into what happens in this short novel, but I will say it has a time travel element where Casey is taken back in time to learn of happenings relating to that time.  From a historical point of view, though some of the details are fictionalized, there were deaths from a munitions factory explosion, president-elect Lincoln’s whistle-stop ride through Morrow, and the history surrounding the Underground Railroad and the dangers faced by slaves. For those who love romance, there is some of that, too, but not so much to scare off anyone who isn’t interested in that genre.

This was truly an enjoyable read and I would definitely recommend it to EVERYONE!

About the Author

Janet Slater is a writer and editor and a former writing instructor at the University of Cincinnati. She has served as editor of two local magazines and several books, and currently is editor of Trail Mail, the newsletter of Friends of the Little Miami State Park. Her love of local history and research inspires her writing, most recently in Time Trail, set just north of Cincinnati where she lives with her husband. She is also the author of A Home in the Storm, a historical fiction book for children ages 8 to 12. Janet volunteers on the board of directors of the Friends of the Little Miami State Park and enjoys inline skating and bicycling on its beautiful trail.

Purchase TIME TRAIL at Amazon.

Looking for Me

By Beth Hoffman

 

Book Blurb

Beth Hoffman’s bestselling debut, Saving CeeCee Honeycutt, won admirers and acclaim with its heartwarming story and cast of unforgettable characters. Now her unique flair for evocative settings and richly drawn Southern personalities shines in her compelling new novel, Looking for Me.

Teddi Overman found her life’s passion for furniture in a broken-down chair left on the side of the road in rural Kentucky. She learns to turn other people’s castoffs into beautifully restored antiques and eventually finds a way to open her own shop in Charleston. There, Teddi builds a life for herself as unexpected and quirky as the customers who visit her shop.  Though Teddi is surrounded by remarkable friends and finds love in the most surprising way, nothing can alleviate the haunting uncertainty she’s felt in the years since her brother Josh’s mysterious disappearance. When signs emerge that Josh might still be alive, Teddi is drawn home to Kentucky.  It’s a journey that could help her come to terms with her shattered family—and to find herself at last.  But first, she must decide what to let go of and what to keep. (Goodreads.com)

My Review

Beth Hoffman is an excellent storyteller.  From early in the book through the end she had me hooked on the story of Teddi Overman.  As a young girl, Teddi discovers her life’s passion when she finds an old chair left on the road near her home in rural Kentucky.  When she takes it home and fixes it up, her mother dismisses it as junk.  Teddi loved it and as an adult rescues old furniture, repairs it, and sells it in her own shop in Charleston, South Carolina.

There were sad stories of the disappearance of her brother Josh and the loss of her parents. The misunderstanding between Teddi and her mother that created a rocky relationship between the two is a story many can relate to. There were truly funny accounts of various characters such as Albert, her grumpy furniture restorer, the hilarity of sticky-fingered Tula Jane Poteet, and a bit of romance.  In all this story had a perfect balance of all these elements.

The characters, of which there were quite a few, were well drawn out and believable.  I especially liked Olivia and her loyalty to her best friend, Teddi.  Sam was a surprise, and you’ll see what I mean when you read the book.  Albert was quite the personality and won my heart from the time I met him. Teddi was a complex character with a lot of hurdles to overcome along life’s path. She eventually discovers where her heart really lies, but it takes a long while for her to realize this.

I will definitely read more by Beth Hoffman and would recommend LOOKING FOR ME to anyone who enjoys women’s fiction.

About the Author

Twelve days after Beth Hoffman’s first novel was published in 2010, she became a New York Times bestselling author with foreign rights selling to prestigious publishers in Italy, Germany, France, Poland, Norway, Hungary, Indonesia, Korea, Israel, and the United Kingdom.

Following an extensive national tour, Beth returned home to Kentucky and the solace of her writing studio. Drawing from vivid memories of childhood on her grandparents’ farm and her love of animals, nature, and antiques, a surprising story quickly took form. When asked about her second novel, which is titled Looking for Me, Beth says: “This book encompasses my deepest passions—it’s the story that woke me in the night and demanded to be told.”

Before beginning her writing career, Beth was the president and co-owner of an interior design studio. An artist as well as an award-winning designer, her paintings are displayed in private and corporate collections in the United States, Canada, and the UK.

Beth lives, along with her husband and two very smart cats, in a restored Queen Anne home in a quaint historic district in Northern Kentucky. Her interests include the rescue of abandoned and abused animals, nature conservancy, birding, historic preservation, and antiquing. (Goodreads.com)

Author Links

Website

Goodreads

Amazon

Pinterest

Facebook

Buy the Book

Amazon

Barnes & Noble

The Small Town Producing 140 Million Books A Year

Nicholas Rossis has unearthed some fascinating information about where that book you’re reading was printed and bound.

Nicholas C. Rossis

Berryville Graphics | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's book Photo by Edward Leonard, Clarke Daily News

The last page of your favorite mystery novel probably offers this brief, final mystery: “Printed and bound in Berryville, Virginia.”

Just where is Berryville, you may ask. A question that can only grow when you learn that a town of some 4,000 people is responsible for producing some 140 million books a year.

A Trappist Monastery And A Printer

As Andrew Madigan of The Washington Post reports, Berryville is the seat of Clarke County, five miles from West Virginia. Buildings of note include a Trappist monastery, a soldier’s home and a very old pie company. With a population of 4,185, Berryville has a healthy, ironic sense of its own obscurity.

And yet, the town’s only major printer, Berryville Graphics (BVG), became in 1998 the nation’s No. 3 book manufacturer with a brand-new patent for its Duratech binding technology. This was a…

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