The Continent of Ruby

By BB Cape

The Continent of RubyTHE CONTINENT OF RUBY is the tale of the author’s thoughts about her marriage and her divorce, her husband’s infidelity, and the terminal diagnosis of her friend’s cancer. It is about reconciling oneself to that fact that life goes on, and being strong.  It is about her friend’s courageous journey from her diagnosis of stage 4 gall bladder cancer until her death. Cape’s life journey takes her to Bali, where she finally understands why she never cried for her friend and why she never would – Ruby’s death “was not powerful enough to claim her spirit.”

This is not a traditional memoir in the sense that it only covers a period of about three and a half months in 2004, and then skips years to December 30, 2008 where B.B. Cape is in Bali.  This is a reflection time in her life and serves to tell the reader how she was able to reconcile all the issues we learned about earlier in the story.  June 13, 2004, the day Ruby got her diagnosis, until September 31, 2004, the day after the Ruby’s memorial in her hometown, gave us insight into the Cape’s life, while concentrating, largely on Ruby’s decline.

I had many issues with the book.  There were quite a few spelling and grammar mistakes to the point it became irritating. A lot of the book concentrated on Ruby to the extent I sometimes felt like I was reading Ruby’s memoir.  There was a lot of medical terminology that caused the story to drag. This would have been better if the author told of Ruby’s condition in more general terms that readers could understand.

Did I like the book?  Yes and no.  No, I did not like it for all of the above reasons. Yes, it was a heartwarming story of loyalty, friendship, love, and sacrifice.

Book Blurb

The true story of a woman who knew her life was about to come undone and let it come undone anyway only to find herself in the redeeming grace of the unknown.

Excerpt

The doctors have found a malignant tumor in Ruby’s gall bladder. They closed her up and designated her case terminal. Stacy calls me, shocked. She repeats the prognosis verbatim: the bile ducts are compromised. In the future, and for the sake of comfort, the ducts can be drained of cancerous cells. There is no therapy being considered, and pain management will be arranged. An oncologist will be consulted. “I am sorry,” the doctor said.

“Why didn’t they just take the gall bladder,” I ask Stacy, ignorant of the ambition of a malignancy, thinking that Ruby’s tumor can be excised with a knife, removed from its habitat, and banished to the hazardous waste bin. My mind is torpid; fear sets in. “Stacy, Stacy,” I call out when her voice trails off. “What else did he say?” I ask, and she repeats the prognosis.

That afternoon Stacy, her husband, son, in-laws, and my children and I stand around Ruby’s hospital bed. Everyone in the cancer ward at Memorial Hospital gets a private room with a view.

Stacy is talking on her cell phone. Everybody else in the room paces. We are the rowdy newcomers to the ward. We do not accept – nor do we plan on accepting – any of its lethargy, unlike the mother of the young woman across the way, who watches with patience and concern as her adult daughter tries to get back into the bed, moving as if her discomfort is the size of the entire room. Even the nurses are slow when summoned. Maybe they think there is no need to rush any more. We bring with us the robust outside world and will not accept the ward’s sluggish pace of feeling, being, and thinking. We resist it all – the children want to watch television, the in-laws need a soda and go in search of a vending machine, and Stacy’s husband needs to go home to walk the dog.

When we look at Ruby, we don’t see her any longer. Instead, we see her cancer. Initially, we think: “How can this happen to one of us? Yesterday she was …” More specifically, we look for physical evidence of the cancer, as if it will expose itself, flip us the finger, stick out its tongue, or howl with laughter right in our faces. But, what is happening is more ominous and technical than that:

FINDINGS COMPATIBLE WITH ADVANCED GALLBLADDER CARCINOMA WITH LIVER INVASION AND LIVER METASIS WITH MASS MEASURING APPROXIMATELY 8.5 X 7.5 CM, EXTENDING THROUGH HEPATIC SEGMENTS 4B, 4A AND TO A LESSER DEGREE, 5. SEVERAL LIVER LESIONS ARE DEMONSTRATED IN THE APPROXIMATELY1.5-CM RANGE.

CANNOT RULE OUT EARLY CARCINOMATOSIS ALONG THE OMENTUM ANTERIORLY EXTENDING TOWARD THE PELVIS.

DUCTAL DILATION IS DEMONSTRATED DUCTAL DILATION EXTENDS INFERIORLY TO THE LEVEL OF THE AMPULLA.

END OF IMPRESSION

On the phone, Stacy tells family and friends her mother has Stage 4 Gall Bladder Cancer. Terminal. Some of them speak with Ruby. Others send their prayers and well wishes. Still others are frightened by the sudden and tragic twist of events; they will call Ruby another time. At the moment, the information is too raw and incomprehensible to process – they were just sitting down to dinner, watching the evening news, not prepared for this news. Stacy is cordial. She says she appreciates their support. Any emails, calls, or cards will “lift the spirits.”

About the Author

BB Cape is a freelance writer and online instructor. Her short stories have appeared in Parade Magazine. She will publish her first novel later this year.

Type of Book: Kindle

Publisher: BB Cape

Publication date: 2/21/2015

Pages: 140 pages

Genre: Memoir

Twitter: @continentofruby

To purchase THE CONTINENT OF RUBY: click Amazon

8 thoughts on “The Continent of Ruby

  1. Wow! Relevant to me on two fronts (a) just got my book back from the publishers for the second round of proof reading – yours is a timely reminder of how important it is to be methodical, and – more importantly – (b) my best friend is in hospital nearby, battling a terminal cancer, hooked up to an experimental blood dialysis machine in the hope of giving her enough time to get her affairs in order. I couldn’t imagine documenting her story. I wouldn’t feel at all in command of the facts, much less her feelings, and I am not sure that how I feel about it would make a story. So, it sounds as if BB Cape tackled a very complex issue, and managed to pull that off to a certain extent?

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Your review is honest and balanced. Sometimes, when we’re especially interested in the subject matter, we’re willing to overlook spelling and grammar mistakes; sometimes not.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I would find the spelling and grammar mistakes annoying also. I read a novel recently that repeatedly used a particular phrase incorrectly and it spoilt my enjoyment of the story. Mistakes in blogs are one thing, but I think an editor is really important for a book. It is comment courtesy to show respect for the reader.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you. Those phone calls are never fun to get, I could make a long list of the calls I’ve gotten – outcome good for some, not for others. Hoping for a positive outcome for your friends.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. I appreciate the honesty of your review, Michelle. It is interesting how the book covers certain periods of time. As for medical terminology, yes, it would need to go easier on that I would think as it is a memoir rather than a medical textbook.

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